PubMed: A Tool to Spot Hidden Conflicts of Interests in Scientific Studies (Vox)

PubMed, “the Google of scientific research,” is now publishing funding information to reveal conflicts of interest in studies. In 2016, 62 scientists and physicians lobbied for the update as part of a broader transparency movement in science.

Industries surrounding nutrition, pharmaceuticals, medical devices, weight loss aids, and sugary drinks are more likely to produce results favorable to funders. Read more on Vox.

Bohemians Unite: It’s All About the #Vanlife Social Media Movement (New Yorker)

ArtVanFoster Huntington, former Ralph Lauren designer, traded in his day job for a 1987 Volkswagen Syncro and a lifetime of adventures. Huntington has acquired millions of Instagram followers using his hashtag “vanlife,” crafting a bohemian lifestyle that has inspired a social media movement.

The hashtag embodies a revived American interest in road trips and hippie-culture, as well as a rejection of the typical workplace. It is also a successful marketing technique.  Read more in The New Yorker.

The More You Use Facebook, The Worse You Feel (Harvard Business Review)

A Harvard Business Review study measured participant well-being and its relationship with Facebook usage. Despite positive effects of real-world social networks, the study confirmed a negative association between mental health and Facebook.

The study also suggested that declines in well-being depended on quantity of use rather than quality, contrasting with previous research. Read more in Harvard Business Review.

Edvertising: Jessen on the Growth of Advertising and Marketing in Schools (Have You Heard)

Sarah Butler Jessen

Sarah Butler Jessen, visiting assistant professor of education, was a guest on the podcast Have You Heard, during which she shared insight into her research into the practice of school marketing.

Listen to the podcast episode “Truth in Edvertising
.” Butler Jessen’s interview begins at 7:45.