Jeff Joseph ’19 Joins Harvard Cancer Research Project

Jeff Joseph ’19 at Harvard this summer

“A teen went from playing soccer in the streets of a third-world country to attending a research program at Harvard in a seven-year span,” Jeff Joseph wrote in his application last winter for one of Bowdoin’s summertime fellowships. It certainly helped that as a boy growing up in Haiti, Joseph nurtured a passion for mathematics along with a love of soccer.

Joseph moved from Haiti to Florida when he was 12 and kept up both interests, eventually landing at Bowdoin. In the spring, he received notice that he had won a funded internship grant — the Peter Buck Student Internship Fund — from Bowdoin Career Planning to do biostatistics and epidemiology research at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health this summer.

Read the full story in Bowdoin News.

The Mold Transforming Japanese Cuisine (Atlantic)

Koji is a fungus found in soy sauce, miso, and sake. The mold, known for its toxicity, was domesticated by humans about 9,000 years ago. Though its closest relatives can be deadly, koji is nontoxic.

Originally used for alcohol, the fungus has been implemented by Asian chefs for centuries. Read more in The Atlantic.

The Pet Economy: How Much Do We Spend On Our Pets? (Atlantic)

Since 1994, pet spending has increased every year and is estimated to have reached nearly $63 billion in 2016. Millennials spend more on pets than any other age group, despite having less money.

Pet and human healthcare have mirrored each other in their rising costs. Yet, according to studies on German and Australian healthcare, pet owners are less likely to visit the doctor.  Read more in The Atlantic.

PubMed: A Tool to Spot Hidden Conflicts of Interests in Scientific Studies (Vox)

PubMed, “the Google of scientific research,” is now publishing funding information to reveal conflicts of interest in studies. In 2016, 62 scientists and physicians lobbied for the update as part of a broader transparency movement in science.

Industries surrounding nutrition, pharmaceuticals, medical devices, weight loss aids, and sugary drinks are more likely to produce results favorable to funders. Read more on Vox.