A Bowdoin Investigation: Can a Maine Marsh Survive Rising Seas?

As Satya Kent ’19 steers a small motor boat down a narrow channel in Maine’s largest marsh in Scarborough, her passenger, environmental scientist Peter Lea, points to the muddy banks rising up steeply on either side.

The high banks look something like a cross-section sliced from a chocolate lover’s multi-layer cake: they have clear strata of deep-brown mud. “Those are essentially former editions of the salt marsh as it has been growing and keeping pace with sea level rise,” explained Lea, an associate professor of earth and oceanographic science at Bowdoin. The bottom visible layers were likely formed 1,000 to 2,000 years ago. Read the full story on Bowdoin News.

Michael Mascia ’93 Named Board President of Global Conservation Group

Michael Mascia, the senior director of social science for the nonprofit Conservation International, has been named board president for the Society for Conservation Biology, the field’s pre-eminent professional society.

Mascia graduated with a bachelor’s degree in biology and European studies from Bowdoin in 1993, and earned a Ph.D. from Duke University in environmental politics and policy in 2000.

In a recently published Q&A, Mascia noted, “We live on a human-dominated planet. People are defining what the future will look like, for better or for worse. Thus, conservation is an inherently social process with social implications. It’s not just what we conserve but how we conserve it that matters.” Read more in Bowdoin News.