Dorn Essay ‘What Is College Good For? (Hint: More Than Just a Job)’ in Chronicle of Higher Education

Charles Dorn

In an essay published in The Chronicle of Higher Education, Charles Dorn, professor of education and associate dean for academic affairs, shares a personal account of his family’s encounters with the question: “What, exactly, is college good for?”

Against a backdrop of higher education’s occupational advantages, Dorn explores other aspects the college experience has to offer, including the pursuit of self-improvement, and that of becoming useful citizens.

Read Dorn’s essay, “What Is College Good For? (Hint: More Than Just a Job).”

Dorn is the author of the book For the Common Good: A New History of Higher Education in America (Cornell University Press, 2017), in which he argues that we can’t understand what’s going on with colleges and universities today until we examine where they have come from, why they were founded, and how society has viewed their function at different points in time.

Joseph Gauld ’51 Reflects on Emerson’s Concept of Self-Reliance (Huffington Post)

Joseph Gauld ’51

Joseph Gauld ’51, founder of the Hyde School in Bath and a recognized expert and commentator on education and parenting, recently published a column in The Huffington Post, in which he reflects on the legacy of Ralph Waldo Emerson, “arguably our greatest philosopher and greatest 19th- century writer.”

 

 

‘For the Common Good’: Dorn Book Challenges ‘Crisis in Higher Ed’

Professor of Education Charles Dorn researched 200 years of higher education history to gain a unique perspective on some of the most vexing issues facing the field today.

In his new book, For the Common Good: A New History of Higher Education in America, Dorn argues that we can’t understand what’s going on with colleges and universities today until we examine where they have come from, why they were founded, and how society has viewed their function at different points in time.

Bowdoin Among Those Recognized for Valuable Undergraduate Research (Inside Higher Ed)

Elizabeth Stemmler

Some members of the scientific community are skeptical when it comes to the value of undergraduate research, according to Inside Higher Education. They often regard this type of research as only being beneficial for the student.

“Such biases could not be more misguided,” said the article, citing a recent study out of Trinity College documenting numerous cases of undergraduate institutions making real academic advances in the field of analytical chemistry. Among the examples mentioned is Elizabeth Stemmler, Bowdoin’s James Stacy Coles Professor of Natural Sciences.