Ellis Price ’18 Works in an Old Maine Mill with Modern Textiles

Art history major and visual arts minor Ellis Price, in Erin Flett’s Westbrook studio.

While studying abroad in Copenhagen, Denmark, last year — a city famous for its love of beautiful design — Catherine “Ellis” Price decided that creating textiles was her calling.

The first textile designs she made, one for a wallpaper and the other for a fabric, were inspired by the Danish landscape — the old canals and the rolling farmland, divided into tidy rows. “I wanted to connect the two landscapes, farming and water,” she said.

Designing patterns — for blankets, rugs, pillows, tea towels, napkins, etc. — incorporates Price’s interests in printmaking, drawing, and photography. Plus it appeals to her down-to-earth side.

“In a sense, textile design is more practical [than fine arts],” she said. “It is something you live with everyday and use everyday. And I think it is pretty interesting how you can do so much with a simple design, like stripes. It might be simple, but you can still create something beautiful and transform a space.” Read the full story in Bowdoin News.

Luke’s Lobster—Co-Led by Bryan Holden ’09—Featured on CBS This Morning

Bryan Holden ’09, managing partner at Luke’s Lobster

Luke’s Lobster, the seafood chain run by Bryan Holden ’09 and his brother Luke (who founded the company), has been featured in a report on CBS This Morning about the strength of the Maine lobster industry. Luke told CBS’s Don Dahler that the price of lobster meat has more than doubled since he started the company seven years ago, and demand continues to outstrip supply, despite the fact that Maine lobstermen hauled in a record catch last year.

One factor keeping prices high, we are told, is the popularity of the lobster roll, with prices now “hovering around $20.” Luke’s Lobster operates more than twenty-five outlets throughout the US and a further six in Japan, all offering Maine-sourced seafood, said Dahler.

Twelve Student Interns Learn on the Job at WEX with Rapkin ’88

A dozen Bowdoin students are taking advantage of an opportunity Career Planning fostered with WEX, a global leader in corporate payments solutions that strives to simplify the complexities of payments systems across continents and industries including vehicle fleet, travel, and healthcare.

(L. to r.) Duncan Cannon ’18, international finance intern; Molly Foley ’19 legal compliance intern; John Dana ’19, sales operations intern; Hilary Rapkin ‘88; Luis Paniagua ’16, Treasury Department intern; Jordan Castonguay ’18, strategy and innovation intern; Ian Dieli ’18, application development Intern; Adrian Van der Eb ’19, marketing intern; Andrew Walter-McNeill ’19, software engineer intern; Justin Weathers ’18, product release intern; Joseph Staudt ’19, corporate communications intern; Simone Laverdiere ’19, acquisitions and new business development intern; Ian Squiers ’19, marketing analytics intern.

The twelve students are part of an ambitious plan by WEX to hire interns from Maine colleges and universities. Hilary Rapkin ’88, senior vice president and general counsel at WEX, participated in a presentation Career Planning had coordinated on campus this past year.

The twelve students are working at the company’s South Portland, Maine, headquarters this summer in roles in a wide range of fields including acquisitions, application development, finance, legal compliance, marketing, product release, sales, and software engineering.

Startup ‘Coach’ Derrick Duplessy ’03 Helps Young Urban Entrepreneurs (Bay State Banner)

Derrick Duplessy ’03

Derrick Duplessy ’03, founder of an organization that helps young entrepreneurs in the Greater Boston area, was profiled by Sandra Larson in The Bay State Banner. He set up the Duplessy Foundation in 2009 “to assist those particularly like himself: children of immigrants forging their own paths.”

Speaking at a recent networking event in Boston, Duplessy—whose parents emigrated from Haiti—described himself thus: “I’m a coach. I work with startups and with artists. The big thing is, there are still many of you that could be doing so much better.” In the last few years, Duplessy said he’s helped people raise $2.6 million through Kickstarter.