Whispering Pines: Eleanor Roosevelt’s Day – December 12, 1942

Whispering Pines

When the 12:44 train pulled in at the Brunswick depot on Saturday, December 12, 1942, (at what one student described as “its customary 1:15 arrival”), it was greeted by a crowd of 200 or more Bowdoin students and citizens of the town, eager to see if First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt would step onto the platform. She did, and was greeted by the cheers of the crowd, a Secret Service agent, a press photographer, members of the Delta Upsilon Lectureship Committee, and two local boys looking for temporary employment as baggage carriers. Fresh from a visit to Radcliffe College the day before, Mrs. Roosevelt had come to Brunswick at the invitation of the members of the Bowdoin chapter of Delta Upsilon Fraternity.

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Whispering Pines: Words to the Wise

Whispering Pines

This is the time of the fall when I notice the encroaching darkness of late afternoon hours, the layer of pine needles that accumulates in just a few hours on the cars in the parking lot behind 85 Federal Street, and the sound of the furnace coming on at night. These signs create a sense of urgency—preparing the garden for a first frost, savoring the sight of sunlight on leaves that are still green, and spending as much time outdoors as I can before a jacket and hat are required.

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Whispering Pines: Something Abides . . .

threepines-BDS

September 8 marked the 187th birthday of Joshua L. Chamberlain of the Class of 1852, the professor-turned-soldier during the Civil War, who rose to the rank of brevet major general and became the thirty-second governor of Maine and the sixth president of Bowdoin College. The home where Chamberlain and his family lived is across the street from the College; it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and has been maintained by the Pejepscot Historical Society as a historic house museum for the past 30 years.

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Whispering Pines: What’s Missing?

threepines-BDS

When I was young (a long, long time ago now), I used to enjoy the picture puzzles in the children’s magazines that could be found in the waiting rooms at the dentist’s or doctor’s office, especially those that had illustrations with  hidden objects or challenged me to find what was missing in a picture. Earlier generations may remember “what’s missing” illustrations created by Norman Rockwell for April Fool’s Day covers for The Saturday Evening Post in the 1940s. Similar games for children and adults are available as apps (applications) for smart phones, such as the popular “What’s Missing??”

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