A Bowdoin Investigation: Can a Maine Marsh Survive Rising Seas?

As Satya Kent ’19 steers a small motor boat down a narrow channel in Maine’s largest marsh in Scarborough, her passenger, environmental scientist Peter Lea, points to the muddy banks rising up steeply on either side.

The high banks look something like a cross-section sliced from a chocolate lover’s multi-layer cake: they have clear strata of deep-brown mud. “Those are essentially former editions of the salt marsh as it has been growing and keeping pace with sea level rise,” explained Lea, an associate professor of earth and oceanographic science at Bowdoin. The bottom visible layers were likely formed 1,000 to 2,000 years ago. Read the full story on Bowdoin News.

Jeff Joseph ’19 Joins Harvard Cancer Research Project

Jeff Joseph ’19 at Harvard this summer

“A teen went from playing soccer in the streets of a third-world country to attending a research program at Harvard in a seven-year span,” Jeff Joseph wrote in his application last winter for one of Bowdoin’s summertime fellowships. It certainly helped that as a boy growing up in Haiti, Joseph nurtured a passion for mathematics along with a love of soccer.

Joseph moved from Haiti to Florida when he was 12 and kept up both interests, eventually landing at Bowdoin. In the spring, he received notice that he had won a funded internship grant — the Peter Buck Student Internship Fund — from Bowdoin Career Planning to do biostatistics and epidemiology research at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health this summer.

Read the full story in Bowdoin News.