Bowdoin’s Rudalevige on a Leaking White House (All Things Considered)

Andrew Rudalevige

Andrew Rudalevige, Bowdoin’s Thomas Brackett Reed Professor of Government, was tapped by NPR for his expertise on the presidency. In an interview for All Things Considered, Rudalevige talks about the various types of leaks, how they compare with those of previous administrations, and whether anything can be done to stop them.

Listen to the interview or read the Q&A.

Evolving as an Artist, Coretta King ’12 Releases New Songs

Coretta King ’12

Like so many singer-songwriters, Coretta King ’12 is working hard to build a reputation for herself in that most competitive of environments—”Music CIty, USA,” aka Nashville, Tennessee.

King credits her education at Bowdoin with giving her the self-belief and determination necessary to succeed in her business. Read more in Bowdoin News.

Lawrence Lindsey ’76 Writes ‘Thoughtful and Compelling Indictment’ of Elected Leaders

Lawrence Lindsey ’76

Lawrence Lindsey ’76 served as a senior staff economist during the Reagan administration and went on to hold prominent positions under presidents George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush. His latest book—Conspiracies of the Ruling Class: How to Break Their Grip Forever (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2017)—is described by Aaron Hughey in the Bowling Green Daily News as a “thoughtful and compelling indictment of our elected leaders.”

Describing Lindsey’s work as a “exceptionally well-researched,” Hughey went on to praise the book for its lack of partisan leaning. “His words tend to ring true regardless of whether the reader is liberal or conservative, Republican or Democrat. Indeed, it is difficult to argue against many of his talking points.” Read Aaron Hughey’s review of Lawrence Lindsey’s Conspiracies.

CS Fellows Use Algorithms to Solve Today’s Problems

Seniors Tucker Williams, Corinne Alini and Phillip Wang

Several computer science majors have fellowships this summer through Bowdoin to devote themselves to finding solutions to real-world problems. They’re devising programs and algorithms to automatically detect archaeological looting, to make homes more energy efficient, or to better predict coastal flooding as the climate becomes more unstable.

Each summer, Bowdoin awards grants to more than 240 students to pursue academic, scientific or artistic projects, or internships, across the disciplines. Read about three computer science majors and their summer projects at Bowdoin News.