Technology Fellows Target Old Mongolian Maps, Tourette’s, and Teacher Mentorships

2017 Gibbons Fellows

Each summer, Bowdoin faculty are invited to apply for funding from the college’s Gibbons Summer Research Program to hire students to help them with technological research. John A. Gibbons, Jr. ‘64 established this grant program to enable students and professors to explore interdisciplinary projects and to develop fresh approaches to the study of complex problems. This year, nine students received Gibbons funding to work on research projects in oceanography, politics, arctic studies, neurology, history, education, psychology, and Italian and German studies.

Read about one student’s work with a long-lost Mongolian manuscript, another’s attempt to improve student teacher mentors in the sciences, and a third’s work to develop online therapy for people with Tourette syndrome.

The Gibbons Program is administered by Bowdoin’s Academic Technology & Consulting group.

Bowdoin Students Take Modern Dance Production to Northampton Spring Dance Festival

Aoki and her eight students were part of MAYDANCE, a month-long festival of contemporary dance in Northampton, MA. Photo: Peter Raper

Assistant Professor of Dance Aretha Aoki concluded the spring semester by taking her Modern Dance III: Repertory class to Northampton, Mass., to perform their work, Well-drawn fields.

The performance took place May 20, 2017, at the School for Contemporary Dance and Thought (SCDT), “a highly reputable studio and performance space with national and international connections,” said Aoki. Read more in Bowdoin News.

Bowdoin Instructor Takes on ‘Wait, Wait… Don’t Tell Me!’ Listener Limerick Challenge (NPR)

Shana Stewart Deeds

Shana Stewart Deeds, a laboratory instructor in biology and environmental studies, was a phone-in guest on NPR’s Wait, Wait.. Don’t Tell Me!

On the quiz show’s July 15, 2017, broadcast, hosted by Peter Sagal, Deeds took part in the Listener Limerick Challenge, in which she was asked to complete three rhymes dealing with some of the more unusual stories in the news recently.

Topics addressed include gluten-free communion wafers and snortable chocolate. Listen to Shana Deeds on Wait, Wait… Don’t Tell  Me!

Monkey Cage: ‘Founding Principles’ Examines Role of the President

Episode Four: The Presidency from Bowdoin College on Vimeo.

The president of the United States is frequently referred to as “the leader of the free world” and thought of as the world’s most powerful person, writes Thomas Brackett Reed Professor of Government Andrew Rudalevige.

But to really understand the role of the country’s chief executive, he continued, they key thing to remember is the “structural weakness” inherent in the office of president. Rudalevige was writing in the Washington Post political science blog, The Monkey Cage, which every Tuesday over the summer is publishing an episode of “Founding Principles,” a series of short videos presented by Rudalevige explaining how American government works.

The latest episode—the fourth of fifteen—examines Article II of the Constitution, which established the presidency. “The history of the American presidency is the history of how presidents have tried to overcome that structural weakness,” said Rudalevige.