Lawrence Lindsey ’76 Writes ‘Thoughtful and Compelling Indictment’ of Elected Leaders

Lawrence Lindsey ’76

Lawrence Lindsey ’76 served as a senior staff economist during the Reagan administration and went on to hold prominent positions under presidents George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush. His latest book—Conspiracies of the Ruling Class: How to Break Their Grip Forever (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2017)—is described by Aaron Hughey in the Bowling Green Daily News as a “thoughtful and compelling indictment of our elected leaders.”

Describing Lindsey’s work as a “exceptionally well-researched,” Hughey went on to praise the book for its lack of partisan leaning. “His words tend to ring true regardless of whether the reader is liberal or conservative, Republican or Democrat. Indeed, it is difficult to argue against many of his talking points.” Read Aaron Hughey’s review of Lawrence Lindsey’s Conspiracies.

Mark Anderson ’74 on Why Putting a Dollar Value on the Environment is a Bad Idea (Bangor Daily News)

Mark Anderson ’74

Former University of Maine instructor Mark Anderson ’74 argues that conventional economic theory is not appropriate when it comes to putting a value on nature.

In Anderson’s column “Pennies for Puffins,” published in the Bangor Daily News public policy blog Stirring the Pot, Anderson described the efforts of some economists to assign monetary value to environmental protection.

“Expressing the values of nature in dollar terms,” he wrote, “crowds out the more profoundly important aspects of nature to our lives.”

Joseph Gauld ’51 Reflects on Emerson’s Concept of Self-Reliance (Huffington Post)

Joseph Gauld ’51

Joseph Gauld ’51, founder of the Hyde School in Bath and a recognized expert and commentator on education and parenting, recently published a column in The Huffington Post, in which he reflects on the legacy of Ralph Waldo Emerson, “arguably our greatest philosopher and greatest 19th- century writer.”

 

 

Reports of Congressional Duel Prompt Recollection of Bowdoin Alumnus, US Rep. Jonathan Cilley

Silhouette of Jonathan Cilley, of the Class of 1825

U.S. Rep. Blake Farenthold, a four-term Texas Republican, told a Corpus Christi radio host that “female senators from the Northeast” were “absolutely repugnant” in their act of opposing the recent GOP health care plan, and went on to add: “If it was a guy from South Texas, I might ask him to step outside and settle this Aaron Burr-style.”

Talk of a congressional duel prompted some to recall U.S. Rep. Jonathan Cilley of Maine, a member of the Class of 1825, who “wound up dead in the dirt,” reports the Sun Journal, after accepting a challenge from U.S. Rep. William Graves of Kentucky to “preserve the honor of the New England states.”

Professor of History Patrick Rael shared some insight with local ABC affiliate WMTW. Watch the clip here.

For more on Cilley and his fate, check out “A Bowdoin Grad and the End of the Duel” in the Winter 2015 issue of Bowdoin Magazine.