A Bowdoin Investigation: Can a Maine Marsh Survive Rising Seas?

As Satya Kent ’19 steers a small motor boat down a narrow channel in Maine’s largest marsh in Scarborough, her passenger, environmental scientist Peter Lea, points to the muddy banks rising up steeply on either side.

The high banks look something like a cross-section sliced from a chocolate lover’s multi-layer cake: they have clear strata of deep-brown mud. “Those are essentially former editions of the salt marsh as it has been growing and keeping pace with sea level rise,” explained Lea, an associate professor of earth and oceanographic science at Bowdoin. The bottom visible layers were likely formed 1,000 to 2,000 years ago. Read the full story on Bowdoin News.

‘Maine’s Most Unique Geological Exhibit’ To Honor Professor Arthur M. Hussey

The Maine Mineral & Gem Museum rock garden in Bethel formally opens August 18.

The Maine Mineral & Gem Museum in Bethel is dedicating a new rock garden to former Bowdoin geology professor Arthur M. Hussey. Described by the museum as “Maine’s most most unique geological exhibit,” the garden officially opens at 6 p.m., Friday August 18, 2017, and will feature twenty-two “truly amazing geological specimens from around the state (and one mammoth specimen from outer space!)”

Hussey taught at Bowdoin for thirty-nine years and died last year. He was 85. Read more in Bowdoin News.