Art History Professor’s New Bowdoin Show Doesn’t Flinch From Death (Art Daily)

The opening of Bowdoin College Museum of Art’s latest show, The Ivory Mirror: The Art of Mortality in Renaissance Europe, was kicked off last week with a keynote address from Stephen Perkinson, the exhibition’s curator and Bowdoin’s Peter M. Small Associate Professor of Art History.

Ivory Mirror explores the visual culture around mortality in Renaissance Europe with its display of almost 70 memento mori, which are artworks meant to evoke life’s preciousness under the shadow of death. The mementos serve as a reminder to viewers to embrace life while they can while not lapsing into sin.

The show will be open through November 26, 2017. In conjunction with the exhibition, a series of public programs will be held at Bowdoin throughout the summer and fall — including film screenings, gallery talks and interdisciplinary programs with health care experts and scholars — that should provide perspectives on death and the choices we make in life.

Laura Griffee’17 Virtually Games Her Way to Interactive Art

During a yearlong independent study, Laura Griffee ’17 developed virtual reality software to make a DIY sculpture tool. Griffee, a visual arts major, worked with Google Cardboard and other virtual reality software to enable users to interact with the sculptures of Assistant Professor of Art Jackie Brown. Read more from Griffee about the project.

Joan Benoit Samuelson ’79 Featured in Art Show on Women’s Sports

Joan Benoit Samuelson ’79

A cereal box displaying an image of Olympic marathon runner Joan Benoit Samuelson ’79 is featured in an art show at Radcliffe College, writes Harvard Magazine. The exhibition, Playing Fair: Title IX at 45, runs until mid-September and takes its name from the 1972 federal law guaranteeing equal rights for women in all educational activities, including athletics.

“The exhibit uses Title IX as a lens to tell a focused narrative about women in sports,” explained curator Susan Ware. Samuelson won the first Olympic women’s marathon gold medal at the 1984 games in Los Angeles.

Portraying Appalachia: How the Movies Can Get it Wrong

Meredith McCarroll

Professor Meredith McCarroll grew up near Asheville, in the mountains of North Carolina. It was only when she moved away that she “became aware of how powerful people’s negative impressions were of Appalachian people, and most of these ‘hillbilly’ stereotypes were gleaned from the movies.”

McCarroll is now working on a book about how Appalachia has been unfairly stereotyped by the film industry. Read more in Bowdoin News.