Monkey Cage: ‘Founding Principles’ Examines Role of the President

Episode Four: The Presidency from Bowdoin College on Vimeo.

The president of the United States is frequently referred to as “the leader of the free world” and thought of as the world’s most powerful person, writes Thomas Brackett Reed Professor of Government Andrew Rudalevige.

But to really understand the role of the country’s chief executive, he continued, they key thing to remember is the “structural weakness” inherent in the office of president. Rudalevige was writing in the Washington Post political science blog, The Monkey Cage, which every Tuesday over the summer is publishing an episode of “Founding Principles,” a series of short videos presented by Rudalevige explaining how American government works.

The latest episode—the fourth of fifteen—examines Article II of the Constitution, which established the presidency. “The history of the American presidency is the history of how presidents have tried to overcome that structural weakness,” said Rudalevige.

The Pros and Cons of a Nuclear Weapons Ban (War on the Rocks)

Nuclear bomb test. File image

The prospect of a ban on nuclear weapons is causing division within the global community, writes Visiting Assistant Professor of Government Rebecca Gibbons in War on the Rocks, a news site specializing in national security and foreign policy issues.

More than 120 countries, said Gibbons, have spent much of the summer finalizing a treaty that would ban the ownership of a nuclear weapons, arguing that they are “inherently immoral.” However, she continued, “the United States and its allies reject that argument,” contending that such an agreement could undermine a key treaty that serves as “the cornerstone of the global nuclear nonprofileration regime.'”

Bowdoin Grads’ Shakespeare-Inspired Comedy Show Gets Rave Reviews in NYC

Olivia Atwood ’17 and Maggie Seymour ’16

Maggie Seymour ’16 and Olivia Atwood ’17 have taken their show 15 Villainous Fools to New York City, and the reception couldn’t be better. It’s described by Shani Friedman in Time Out New York as a “highly modern and clever take on Shakespeare’s The Comedy of Errors,” and a “riotous showcase for two performers with standout comedic timing.”

Writing in the online theater magazine Curtain Up, Deirdre Donavon said “15 Villainous Fools has winning simplicity,” describing Atwood and Seymour as “terrific clowns,” who give the old play a “new immediacy.”

The website Show-Score, which aggregates critic and audience reviews for all shows on Broadway, Off-Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway (the category this show falls under), gives the production a high score of 92.

The show was also listed in New York Magazine recently as one of the “top twenty-five things to see, hear, watch, and read.”

15 Villainous Fools runs at the People’s Improv Theater’s Loft Theater (aka the PIT Loft), until August 19. Click here to purchase tickets.

Luke’s Lobster—Co-Led by Bryan Holden ’09—Featured on CBS This Morning

Bryan Holden ’09, managing partner at Luke’s Lobster

Luke’s Lobster, the seafood chain run by Bryan Holden ’09 and his brother Luke (who founded the company), has been featured in a report on CBS This Morning about the strength of the Maine lobster industry. Luke told CBS’s Don Dahler that the price of lobster meat has more than doubled since he started the company seven years ago, and demand continues to outstrip supply, despite the fact that Maine lobstermen hauled in a record catch last year.

One factor keeping prices high, we are told, is the popularity of the lobster roll, with prices now “hovering around $20.” Luke’s Lobster operates more than twenty-five outlets throughout the US and a further six in Japan, all offering Maine-sourced seafood, said Dahler.