Jenny Ibsen ’18 Maps a Changing Portland Waterfront

The task of explaining how a city became what it is has traditionally fallen to historians, or perhaps novelists. But a Bowdoin student is spending her summer preparing to create a different sort of account of the Portland waterfront.

Jenny Ibsen ’18 has Phocas Family Fellowship from Bowdoin to start her capstone project for her self-designed major of urban studies.

In addition to writing a thesis paper, she will be creating an interactive website that combines journalism, sociology, art, and history to tell the story of a transforming Portland waterfront.

Jenny Ibsen ’18 Maps a Changing Portland Waterfront

Bowdoin and the Environment: Students Experience Iceland in the Making

Earth and Oceanographic Science professor Collin Roesler offers a glimpse of what she, three other Bowdoin faculty, and 20 Bowdoin students experienced on a recent scientific trip to Iceland.

“Iceland is an ideal location to study the causal relationships and the interactions between tectonics, volcanism, glaciation, ecology, and oceanography,” said Roesler, who led the trip. “Rather than being a show-and-tell tour, this field seminar is designed to foster collaboration, active learning, and discovery for students and staff,” she added.

Videographer Wilder Nicholson ’16 joined the students and Earth and Oceanographic Science Department faculty on their trip, capturing the group’s field research in some spectacular settings.

Stay tuned for more video and stories from Nicholson and writer/illustrator Abby McBride, who also traveled with the group.

Art History Professor’s New Bowdoin Show Doesn’t Flinch From Death (Art Daily)

The opening of Bowdoin College Museum of Art’s latest show, The Ivory Mirror: The Art of Mortality in Renaissance Europe, was kicked off last week with a keynote address from Stephen Perkinson, the exhibition’s curator and Bowdoin’s Peter M. Small Associate Professor of Art History.

Ivory Mirror explores the visual culture around mortality in Renaissance Europe with its display of almost 70 memento mori, which are artworks meant to evoke life’s preciousness under the shadow of death. The mementos serve as a reminder to viewers to embrace life while they can while not lapsing into sin.

The show will be open through November 26, 2017. In conjunction with the exhibition, a series of public programs will be held at Bowdoin throughout the summer and fall — including film screenings, gallery talks and interdisciplinary programs with health care experts and scholars — that should provide perspectives on death and the choices we make in life.

A Coach-free and ‘Lovably Ragtag’ Ultimate Frisbee Team (GUM)

Bowdoin’s ultimate frisbee team Chaos Theory

In a recent post for the Girls’ Ultimate Movement blog, Carly Berlin ’18 describes her Bowdoin ultimate frisbee team as fiercely independent — so much so that it has resisted finding a coach. This go-it-alone attitude is both a source of frustration and pride for Berlin.

“We are missing out on the advice of players who have thought about this game for much longer than we have, and we lack an authority figure outside of our own power structure,” she writes. But she adds, “But we have also, undoubtedly, done well on our own. We entered the postseason series with a nearly spotless record.”