Bowdoin’s Rudalevige on a Leaking White House (All Things Considered)

Andrew Rudalevige

Andrew Rudalevige, Bowdoin’s Thomas Brackett Reed Professor of Government, was tapped by NPR for his expertise on the presidency. In an interview for All Things Considered, Rudalevige talks about the various types of leaks, how they compare with those of previous administrations, and whether anything can be done to stop them.

Listen to the interview or read the Q&A.

Dorn Essay ‘What Is College Good For? (Hint: More Than Just a Job)’ in Chronicle of Higher Education

Charles Dorn

In an essay published in The Chronicle of Higher Education, Charles Dorn, professor of education and associate dean for academic affairs, shares a personal account of his family’s encounters with the question: “What, exactly, is college good for?”

Against a backdrop of higher education’s occupational advantages, Dorn explores other aspects the college experience has to offer, including the pursuit of self-improvement, and that of becoming useful citizens.

Read Dorn’s essay, “What Is College Good For? (Hint: More Than Just a Job).”

Dorn is the author of the book For the Common Good: A New History of Higher Education in America (Cornell University Press, 2017), in which he argues that we can’t understand what’s going on with colleges and universities today until we examine where they have come from, why they were founded, and how society has viewed their function at different points in time.

Bowdoin’s Lea Discusses Larsen C Ice Shelf

Scientists had been monitoring the crack in the Larsen C ice shelf for several years

An iceberg the size of Delaware recently broke away from western Antarctica and is now floating in the ocean. A big deal, to be sure, said Associate Professor of Earth and Oceanographic Science Peter Lea, but not unexpected.

“The crack in the Larsen C ice shelf had been growing for ten years, so it was a question of when, not if, the break-off, or ‘calving’ as it’s known, would happen.” Read more about it in Bowdoin News.

Founding Principles: Everything You Need to Know about How the Constitution Created the Judicial Branch (Monkey Cage)

The Washington Post political science blog Monkey Cage continues its weekly series presenting episodes from Bowdoin’s Founding Principles, a series of videos designed to explain American government and how it works.

This week narrator Andrew Rudalevige, Bowdoin’s Thomas Brackett Reed Professor of Government, examines the Judiciary and the establishment of the Supreme Court — the only court the Constitution actually creates. Read Rudalevige’s Monkey Cage piece, “Here’s everything you need to know about how the Constitution created the judicial branch, in a 15-minute video” and watch other Founding Principles videos here.