Archives for July 2017

Bowdoin Professor Outlines Legal Risks of Local Climate Change Regulations

Assistant Professor of Government and Environmental Studies Shana Starobin

Shana Starobin, a newly appointed assistant professor of government and environmental studies who will teach Environmental Policy and Politics in the fall, has published new commentary on climate change regulation in Public Administration Review, a leading journal for scholars and practitioners of public administration.

Starobin’s writing is part of an online symposium reflecting on how the country’s current political environment will affect the policy landscape for future action on climate change.

In the article, Starobin and her co-author analyze efforts in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to enforce more energy-efficient standards in building codes. “With the federal government’s receding role on climate change, subnational governments may offer the only meaningful hope for the United States to make significant policy progress,” they argue. “Although state and local affirmation of the Paris Agreement provides reason for optimism, a necessary condition for success of subnational regulation will be careful attention to larger legal constraints, a hard lesson Albuquerque officials learned nearly a decade ago.”

Mark Anderson ’74 on Why Putting a Dollar Value on the Environment is a Bad Idea (Bangor Daily News)

Mark Anderson ’74

Former University of Maine instructor Mark Anderson ’74 argues that conventional economic theory is not appropriate when it comes to putting a value on nature.

In Anderson’s column “Pennies for Puffins,” published in the Bangor Daily News public policy blog Stirring the Pot, Anderson described the efforts of some economists to assign monetary value to environmental protection.

“Expressing the values of nature in dollar terms,” he wrote, “crowds out the more profoundly important aspects of nature to our lives.”