Repairing the ‘Leaky Pipeline’ of Women in STEM: Clare Booth Luce Fellows Discuss Their Research

Meg Freiberger '16 (left) and Megan Maher (right) are this years recipients

Meg Freiberger ’16 (left) and Megan Maher ’16 (right) are this year’s recipients of the Clare Booth Luce Fellowship

Although the percentage of STEM degrees for men and women are roughly the same, this fact is not reflected in the number of women in tenure-track positions and intensive research positions in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math. This phenomenon is called the “leaky pipeline,” and it’s a problem that the Clare Booth Luce Fellowship tries to address.

Megan Maher ’16 and Meg Freiberger ’16 are this year’s recipients of the fellowship. While they both highlight the encouragement their professors and peers at Bowdoin give them to pursue an education and career in STEM fields, they also admit they are concerned about the environments they might encounter after they graduate.

Read more about their research and their perspectives on women in STEM.

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