Bowdoin News: Clam Farming and Green Crab Soup; Maine Muslims Describe Life After Trump

Bowdoin College hosted two speakers this week who are exploring ways that Mainers who earn their livelihoods from the sea might respond to a warming ocean and changing marine ecosystem. The Gulf of Maine is heating up faster than 99 percent of the world’s oceans, and scientists foresee a time when historically lucrative fisheries—like lobstering and clamming—are gone, replaced with fish species unfamiliar to us. Read more about a future of clam farming and green crab soup.

The Muslim Student Association and Howell House on Tuesday night invited to campus a panel of Muslim immigrants who are working as educators, writers, activists, and politicians in Maine. The speakers shared their stories about starting their lives in the US and how President Trump administration’s rhetoric and actions have affected them and Muslim communities in the state. Read the story by Busra Eriz ’17.

Boycott Culture Has CEOs Walking the Tightrope (Bloomberg)

A Bloomberg study finds 57 percent of executives believe boycotts do indeed impact their companies, and many are finding it’s difficult to avoid political controversy—even through silence.

“Consumers are holding brands accountable as though they were political candidates, and they’re voting again and again,” said Micho Spring, head of global corporate practice at Weber Shandwick, a public relations firm that handles crisis management, in this Bloomberg article.

The Answer May Be Blowing in Ford’s $200 Million Wind Tunnel (M Live)

The not-exactly-aerodynamic Ford Model T.

Ford Motor Company aims to enhance both production and racing vehicles by investing in new testing facilities in Michigan.

The car maker has announced plans to build a wind tunnel and climatic chamber that will allow it to improve fuel efficiency in its vehicles. The tunnel will generate forces up to 200 mph and cost $200 million, and will “replicate real-world drag through a rolling road aerodynamic tunnel that enables Ford to bring the road to the vehicle, rather than the vehicle to the road,” Ford explains. Read more.

Why Most People Quit Their Jobs—And Why It’s Avoidable (Fast Company)

According to Gallup’s State of the American Workplace report, 51 percent of the workforce are actively searching for new jobs. Much employee dissatisfaction evidently comes down to problems with a manager’s communication.

Often, leaders are unable to make employees feel enthusiastic about their futures or recognize their accomplishments. Bosses even fail to communicate benefits such as health insurance or paid time off. The lesson? Employees quit the boss, not the company.  Read more.