Purple Media Plunge Update: What Happened When Students Read News From the Other Side

Successful participants of the Bowdoin Polar Bear Purple Media Plunge received T-shirts with this logo, designed by Laura Griffee ’17

For one month, fifty-two students and one staff member forced themselves to break from their comfortable routines by reading news from across the political divide.

They were volunteers in the Polar Bear Purple Media Plunge at Bowdoin, an experiment in bipartisan news exposure organized by Assistant Professor of Economics Dan Stone with help from staff and students. Read about the plunge results in Bowdoin News.

Bowdoin’s Rudalevige Critiques Trump’s Use of Executive Actions (Vice)

Andrew Rudalevige

Andrew Rudalevige

Thomas Brackett Reed Professor of Government Andrew Rudalevige, tapped once again for his expertise on the use of executive orders, says he believes President Trump’s executive orders result from the campaign’s lack of focus in developing a policy agenda and calendar.

“Most key White House [officials on Trump’s team] don’t have experience in working with or drafting complex regulatory change.” The orders therefore provide an “administrative place holder of ‘progress made’ or ‘promises kept.’” Read more in Vice.

Bowdoin’s Cerf Shares Personal Holocaust Stories at Wagner College (NY1)

Steve Cerf, Bowdoin’s George Lincoln Skolfield Jr. Professor of German Emeritus and the son of Holocaust survivors, helped Staten Island’s Wagner College observe Holocaust Remembrance Day last week with a talk involving letters written by his grandparents, who were killed at a death camp in 1942. An excerpt from an interview with Cerf was featured on NY1.

PubMed: A Tool to Spot Hidden Conflicts of Interests in Scientific Studies (Vox)

PubMed, “the Google of scientific research,” is now publishing funding information to reveal conflicts of interest in studies. In 2016, 62 scientists and physicians lobbied for the update as part of a broader transparency movement in science.

Industries surrounding nutrition, pharmaceuticals, medical devices, weight loss aids, and sugary drinks are more likely to produce results favorable to funders. Read more on Vox.