Bowdoin News: Clam Farming and Green Crab Soup; Maine Muslims Describe Life After Trump

Bowdoin College hosted two speakers this week who are exploring ways that Mainers who earn their livelihoods from the sea might respond to a warming ocean and changing marine ecosystem. The Gulf of Maine is heating up faster than 99 percent of the world’s oceans, and scientists foresee a time when historically lucrative fisheries—like lobstering and clamming—are gone, replaced with fish species unfamiliar to us. Read more about a future of clam farming and green crab soup.

The Muslim Student Association and Howell House on Tuesday night invited to campus a panel of Muslim immigrants who are working as educators, writers, activists, and politicians in Maine. The speakers shared their stories about starting their lives in the US and how President Trump administration’s rhetoric and actions have affected them and Muslim communities in the state. Read the story by Busra Eriz ’17.

The Answer May Be Blowing in Ford’s $200 Million Wind Tunnel (M Live)

The not-exactly-aerodynamic Ford Model T.

Ford Motor Company aims to enhance both production and racing vehicles by investing in new testing facilities in Michigan.

The car maker has announced plans to build a wind tunnel and climatic chamber that will allow it to improve fuel efficiency in its vehicles. The tunnel will generate forces up to 200 mph and cost $200 million, and will “replicate real-world drag through a rolling road aerodynamic tunnel that enables Ford to bring the road to the vehicle, rather than the vehicle to the road,” Ford explains. Read more.

The Latest at Bowdoin’s Museums and the Nine Other ‘Must-See’ Museums of 2017 (Smithsonian)

“Rooftops of Nagoya,” 1963, woodblock by Junichiro Sekino (準一郎關野), Japanese, 1914–1988. Gift of D. Lee Rich, P’78, ’80 and John Hubbard Rich Jr., Class of 1939 Litt.D. 1974, P’78, ’80. Part of the Bowdoin College Museum of Art exhibition Sosaku-hanga: Twentieth Century Japanese Creative Prints.

If you’re traveling the globe in 2017, Smithsonian magazine has come out with a list of nine “must-see” museums opening this year.

And, of course, if you find yourself in Bowdoin’s neck of the woods,  you must check out the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, which is currently showing, among other exhibitions, Sosaku-hanga: Twentieth Century Japanese Creative Prints, an artistic form of expression from twentieth-century Japan, and the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum, which just this week opened Melting Away: Arctic Cultural Heritage at Risk, featuring photographs documenting the effects of rising Arctic temperatures.

The Decline of the Urban Center: Global Challenges to City Demographics (Brookings Institute)

Globally, urban centers have experienced hits to economic growth, due to aging populations, declines in fertility rates, and lower migrations to cities.

The Brookings Institute compares the US, Western Europe, and Japan in order to discern the causes and consequences of urban demographic change.

Between 2000 and 2015, the populations of the world’s largest cities declined 6 percent. City populations are expected to decline another 17 percent in the next decade.

The report reveals the US to be in a superior demographic position to either Japan or Western Europe, due to its higher fertility rate and greater migration. Read more.