Boycott Culture Has CEOs Walking the Tightrope (Bloomberg)

A Bloomberg study finds 57 percent of executives believe boycotts do indeed impact their companies, and many are finding it’s difficult to avoid political controversy—even through silence.

“Consumers are holding brands accountable as though they were political candidates, and they’re voting again and again,” said Micho Spring, head of global corporate practice at Weber Shandwick, a public relations firm that handles crisis management, in this Bloomberg article.

Two European Culture Capitals are Partying Like It’s 2017 (Newsweek)

Two European cities — Aarhus, on the coast of Denmark, and Kingston-upon-Hull, 450 miles away on the coast of England — promise year-round celebrations of art and culture to boost their morale and economies.

Aarhus, awarded the EU’s Capital of Culture, hopes to connect to residents and art lovers by focusing on children. Hull, second place in the U.K.’s City of Culture, aims to heal divisions in the maritime community by creating open art spaces of public involvement. Read more.

The Latest at Bowdoin’s Museums and the Nine Other ‘Must-See’ Museums of 2017 (Smithsonian)

“Rooftops of Nagoya,” 1963, woodblock by Junichiro Sekino (準一郎關野), Japanese, 1914–1988. Gift of D. Lee Rich, P’78, ’80 and John Hubbard Rich Jr., Class of 1939 Litt.D. 1974, P’78, ’80. Part of the Bowdoin College Museum of Art exhibition Sosaku-hanga: Twentieth Century Japanese Creative Prints.

If you’re traveling the globe in 2017, Smithsonian magazine has come out with a list of nine “must-see” museums opening this year.

And, of course, if you find yourself in Bowdoin’s neck of the woods,  you must check out the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, which is currently showing, among other exhibitions, Sosaku-hanga: Twentieth Century Japanese Creative Prints, an artistic form of expression from twentieth-century Japan, and the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum, which just this week opened Melting Away: Arctic Cultural Heritage at Risk, featuring photographs documenting the effects of rising Arctic temperatures.

What ‘Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel’ Teaches Us about Technology (The Atlantic)

The Atlantic explores Virginia Lee Burton’s Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel, an early twentiethcentury children’s book and ostensible parable for technological change.

The book, and other Burton classics, deal with automation and its effect on jobs and industry. Burton’s texts display an ambivalence to technology and ask the pertinent question: Is progress a good thing? Read more.