Whispering Pines: The Scholar and the World

Whispering Pines

“The scholar and the world! The endless strife,
The discord in the harmonies of life!
The love of learning, the sequestered nooks,
And all the sweet serenity of books;
The market-place, the eager love of gain,
Whose aim is vanity, and whose end is pain!”

– from “Morituri Salutamus” (1875) by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

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Whispering Pines: ‘Those Who Do the World’s Work’

Whispering Pines

Earlier this month, as Hurricane Matthew left a path of destruction across Haiti and eastern Cuba and threatened the Atlantic coast of Florida, Georgia, and the Carolinas, US Coast Guard personnel prepared for the worst, tracking the hurricane, warning residents, preparing for search and rescue missions by air and water, and coordinating efforts with local and state officials.

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Whispering Pines: Their Lives in Front of Them—The Class of 1866

Whispering Pines

One day in the fall of 1864, twenty-one members of the Class of 1866 posed for a photograph on the steps of the Chapel, sporting the various styles of chapeaux that their status as juniors entitled them to wear on campus. Then, as now, it was not unheard of for students to be admitted to a class, leave for financial reasons or changes in family circumstances, transfer from (or to) another college, be dismissed for academic insufficiency or breaches of conduct, or have their studies interrupted by military service. As a result, the class roster for varied a great deal from year to year, especially during the Civil War years.

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Whispering Pines: Famous, and Yet Not Fêted

Whispering Pines

To mark the 100th anniversary of Alfred Kinsey’s graduation from Bowdoin in 1916, Professors Jill Smith (German), Marilyn Reizbaum (English; Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies Program), and David Hecht (History) organized a symposium that explored Kinsey’s influence on popular culture and scholarship on human sexuality.

Sixty years after Kinsey’s death, aspects of his life, work, and legacy remain the subject of debate in scientific circles. My initial plan was to write a column to highlight the symposium, but the project grew. After all, Alfred C. Kinsey is perhaps the most famous Bowdoin alumnus that we tend not to talk about. About once every ten years, a story would appear in The Orient, carefully researched by a student who discovers anew the Kinsey who became a household name, and yet whose name is rarely spoken in American households these days.

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