Art History Professor’s New Bowdoin Show Doesn’t Flinch From Death (Art Daily)

The opening of Bowdoin College Museum of Art’s latest show, The Ivory Mirror: The Art of Mortality in Renaissance Europe, was kicked off last week with a keynote address from Stephen Perkinson, the exhibition’s curator and Bowdoin’s Peter M. Small Associate Professor of Art History.

Ivory Mirror explores the visual culture around mortality in Renaissance Europe with its display of almost 70 memento mori, which are artworks meant to evoke life’s preciousness under the shadow of death. The mementos serve as a reminder to viewers to embrace life while they can while not lapsing into sin.

The show will be open through November 26, 2017. In conjunction with the exhibition, a series of public programs will be held at Bowdoin throughout the summer and fall — including film screenings, gallery talks and interdisciplinary programs with health care experts and scholars — that should provide perspectives on death and the choices we make in life.

Rudalevige: Bowdoin’s ‘Founding Principles’ Series Aims to Tackle ‘Constitutional Illiteracy’ (Monkey Cage)

Andrew Rudalevige

Andrew Rudalevige

Writing in his regular Monkey Cage blog in the Washington Post, Andrew Rudalevige, Bowdoin’s Thomas Brackett Reed Professor of Government, expressed dismay over the level of public ignorance in the US over constitutional issues.

To try and tackle this “constitutional illiteracy,” Monkey Cage is publishing Rudalevige’s “Founding Principles” video series every Tuesday over the summer. The first of the fifteen episodes deals with what he describes as “the most basic of the Constitution’s principles: the separation of powers.”

Read Rudalevige’s latest Monkey Cage political science blog, which features the first of the “Founding Principles” series.

Tom Davidson ’94 Launches Baseball-Themed Summer Learning Platform

Tom Davidson ’94, photo credit: EverFi

Tom Davidson ’94—CEO of educational technology company EVERFI—aims to stop the so-called “summer slide” experienced by school kids at this time of year, according to Roger Groves in Forbes.com. EVERFI has teamed up with Major League Baseball to launch a new learning platform described by Groves as “carefully disguised teaching vehicles.”

The program, called “Summer Slugger,” features thirty six interactive baseball-themed computer games designed to boost math and literacy skills. According to Davidson, “each fall teachers spend an average of six weeks re-teaching their students old material that was lost during the summer months.”