A Big Book of Wildflowers: Kate Furbish’s Botanical Drawings

kate furbish

Vibernum lantanoides, or Hobblebush. Brunswick, 1876

For more than 100 years, Bowdoin Library’s George J. Mitchell Department of Special Collections and Archives has protected botanist Kate Furbish’s watercolors of Maine flora.

The library has recently partnered with Jed Lyons ’74, president and CEO of Rowman & Littlefield, to publish, for the first-time, a complete two-volume edition of Furbish’s illustrations of Maine’s flowering plants and conifers.

The new green-bound books are massive, together containing more than 1,300 pages. Each page is devoted to a full-size, full-color reproduction of a Furbish painting. Read about the Kate Furbish and the new books.

Museum of Art Portrait Exhibition a ‘Valuable Learning Experience’ (Wall Street Journal)

Marsden Hartley (1877–1943), "One Portrait of One Woman," 1916, oil on composition board. Collection of the Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, bequest of Hudson D. Walker from the Ione and Hudson

Marsden Hartley (1877–1943), “One Portrait of One Woman,” 1916, oil on composition board.
Collection of the Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum at the University of Minnesota,
Minneapolis, Minnesota, bequest of Hudson D. Walker from the Ione and Hudson.

The Bowdoin College Museum of Art exhibition This Is a Portrait If I Say So: Identity in American Art, 1912 to Today comprising more than sixty abstract, symbolic, and conceptual portraits is a “valuable learning experience,” according to a review in The Wall Street Journal.

Reviewer Judith H. Dobrzynski writes, “Bowdoin deserves credit for being the first museum to focus solely on the evolution of these works in the U.S., especially in a populist era in which museums are aiming for large attendance rather than large ideas.” Read the review.

2016 Gibbons Fellows Use Technology to Solve Complex Problems

This summer, eleven students are using and adapting technology to explore interdisciplinary areas and foster “fresh approaches to the study of complex problems.” They are collaborating with professors in a range of disciplines, from government to art and neuroscience. Their work is funded by the Gibbons Summer Research Program, which was established by John A. Gibbons, Jr. ’64 to encourage interdisciplinary thinking and work.


Bowdoin’s 2016 Gibbons Fellows by Bowdoin College on Exposure

Mapping Stories as Done by Kurt Vonnegut and Artificial Intelligence (The Atlantic)

19thcenturycookerybooks-145In lectures writer Kurt Vonnegut would sometimes map out the narrative arcs of popular stories such as Cinderella to show how the protagonist, so often plagued with troubles in the beginning, typically wound up better off in the end.

Now, researchers at the University of Vermont are using artificial intelligence to map the swings and changes in popular pieces of fiction, from Harry Potter to Oedipus.