Boycott Culture Has CEOs Walking the Tightrope (Bloomberg)

A Bloomberg study finds 57 percent of executives believe boycotts do indeed impact their companies, and many are finding it’s difficult to avoid political controversy—even through silence.

“Consumers are holding brands accountable as though they were political candidates, and they’re voting again and again,” said Micho Spring, head of global corporate practice at Weber Shandwick, a public relations firm that handles crisis management, in this Bloomberg article.

Bowdoin Senior Follows 64-year-old Art History Trail to Hiroshima

Michael Amano ’17. Photo by Anna Aridome.

The four artists are all elderly now, all still living in Hiroshima. Last summer, a Bowdoin student visited them to talk about drawings they had made as children 64 years ago in 1952 — seven years after the US dropped nuclear bombs on their city.

Revisiting their childhood paintings prompted them to share difficult memories of the years following the carnage. They offered their reflections on war, struggle, peace, and survival. And, perhaps a bit surprisingly, they smiled a lot as they looked at their pictures.

Bowdoin’s Michael Amano ’17 had a Curatorial Fellowship from the Bowdoin College Museum of Art to spend last summer in Japan tracking down and interviewing some of the people who had participated in a 1952 art exchange between Japanese and US schoolchildren. Read the story.

Two European Culture Capitals are Partying Like It’s 2017 (Newsweek)

Two European cities — Aarhus, on the coast of Denmark, and Kingston-upon-Hull, 450 miles away on the coast of England — promise year-round celebrations of art and culture to boost their morale and economies.

Aarhus, awarded the EU’s Capital of Culture, hopes to connect to residents and art lovers by focusing on children. Hull, second place in the U.K.’s City of Culture, aims to heal divisions in the maritime community by creating open art spaces of public involvement. Read more.

Of Cupid and Lupercalia: The Origins of Valentine’s Day (New York Times)

From the Museum of Art’s collection “Betye Saar’s Valentines for Helen Hughes.”

Roman bacchanal? A chance to celebrate spring in February? The New York Times looks into the origins of Valentine’s Day — and what it has come to mean for us.

Read “Valentine’s Day: Did It Start as a Roman Party or to Celebrate an Execution?

Also: Check out the Museum of Art’s collection of valentines and other cards by renowned American artist Betye Saar.