Remembering the Holocaust, and Overseer Emerita Judith Isaacson, with a Bowdoin Garden

On the eve of Yom HaShoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day), April 23, a group of almost 50 people gathered on the Bowdoin campus to dedicate a new daffodil garden planted in the memory of the 1.5 million children who died in the Nazi death camps. The garden is Bowdoin’s contribution to the Daffodil Project, a worldwide effort to plant one daffodil for each child who died.

Sunday’s garden ceremony and Yom HaShoah service, held on a warm spring day as the daffodil leaves poked up from the ground, was a chance to dedicate the garden and honor Judith Magyar Isaacson, Bowdoin overseer emerita, a Hungarian-Jewish American educator, and Auschwitz survivor who settled in Maine after marrying Irving Isaacson, a native of Auburn/Lewiston.
Read the story in Bowdoin News.

Bowdoin Marches for Science

Two busloads of Bowdoin staff, students, and faculty headed to the Saturday morning March for Science in Portland, Maine, joining the many thousands of people who marched in defense of science in the US and around the world.

The Bowdoin group was organized by Professor of Physics Madeleine Msall, Sustainability Outreach Coordinator Bethany Taylor, Emily Ruby ’19 and Zoe Wood ’18. Students and professors from across the sciences and humanities came out for the event.

Hadley Horch, associate professor of biology and neuroscience, said she decided to march because she wants society to be data driven. “We should gather as many facts as we can about a problem and use what we know to solve problems and make policy. And that, to me, should not be a political issue,” she said.

Kristen Gunther ’09 Leads the March for Science Charge

Kristen Gunther ’09

We are used to seeing people take to the streets to defend their rights or a particular political point of view. But can you get people to march for a mode of inquiry? Kristen Gunther ’09 believes so, and is working to make it happen.

With a small team of like-minded scientists and science supporters, Gunther has for the last 10 weeks been mobilizing people across the country and the world to join the March for Science on April 22.

Since the end of January, Gunther has been working as the March for Science’s “mission strategy” leader, honing the goals, values, and language of the movement.

“It’s a powerfully aspirational movement,” she said recently during a telephone conversation. “It is a moment for people to articulate what they want the relationship between science and the broader society or common good to be. People are working hard at saying, this is how we can support a robust scientific enterprise, here is how it serves people, and this is how it applies to policy in support of the common good.” Read the story in Bowdoin News.

Professor Jean Yarbrough: ‘How I Became a Conservative’

Jean Yarbrough

Taking her cue from the Lady Gaga song “Born This Way,” government professor Jean Yarbrough announced at a recent talk about her politics that she “was not born this way.”

“I was not born into a conservative family, I was not born into a Republican family, and I am still an outlier in my birth family,” revealed Yarbrough, who is Bowdoin’s Gary M. Pendy Professor in Social Sciences, Government and Legal Studies and an expert in political philosophy and American political thought.

The talk was organized by the Eisenhower Forum, a conservative-leaning political discussion group at Bowdoin. Read the story in Bowdoin News.