Museum of Art to Cover Travel Costs for Schools in Need

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A school group at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art

The Bowdoin College Museum of Art is now covering the travel costs of some school groups, after-school programs, and student organizations that would like to visit its galleries. The Bank of America Charitable Foundation, Inc., and a gift from a private donor helped the Museum create the new student transportation fund.

The gifts come as the Museum has seen an increase in visits from K-12 groups. The number of students visiting the Museum rose by 46 percent this past year.

“As the only encyclopedic collection in the state of Maine, the Museum views its collection as a unique and valuable resource not only for the students and faculty of Bowdoin College, but also for the citizens of the state,” say Anne Goodyear and Frank Goodyear, the Museum’s co-directors.

Bowdoin’s Organic Garden Opens Minds and Mouths (Bangor Daily News)

Bowdoin Organic GardenWhen student interns learn how to grow vegetables and flowers in Bowdoin’s organic garden, they don’t just learn the basics of farming, they also learn what a freshly picked red pepper or tomato.

“It opens up the mind,” garden supervisor Jeremy Tardif told the Bangor Daily News. Read the article, “On the farm at Bowdoin College, education grows organically.”

 

Disconnect: Do Government Lawyers Not Understand the Internet? (Washington Post)

computer laptopThe Washington Post explores the disconnect between government lawyers and the Internet, particularly through issues of cybersecurity. With the rise of technical cases, it seems too few lawyers understand computers code, its networks, and its users.

It’s also becoming more difficult to set legal boundaries around mass surveillance, particularly with the Justice Department’s decade-old Electronic Surveillance Manual. Read “Government lawyers don’t understand the Internet. That’s a problem.”

Leaf Peepers, This One is For You (Smithsonian)

Fall foliage256The best way to see autumn, according to Smithsonian Magazine, is to drive. Its editors have assembled a list of routes across America that maximize views of the blooming deciduous trees.

The routes cover 3,000 miles across 31 states and include both national scenic highways and back roads. Each route is accompanied by a list of activities available in the region, as well as what to expect along the way. See if your favorite route made the list—and find new ones—here.